University of California The Spy Who Came in From the Cold E Portfolio

University of California The Spy Who Came in From the Cold E Portfolio

Description

Make a Final Eportfolio, u did it before for me in summer. Write a 300word reflection.

Your Final ePortfolio: Components and Grading Criteria

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Logistical Matters: The final submission deadline of your final ePortfolio is Thursday, December 20th, 2020 at 11:59 pm. To submit your ePortfolio, please email me the link by the deadline. Portfolios submitted past this deadline will not be accepted.

A. The Basics

Required Elements:

-Reflective Introduction (300 words minimum, multimodal)

-Genre Analysis Essay, Final Version

-Imitation Project Essay, Final Version

While these required elements will give a basic shape to your ePortfolio, the specific details of its organization are yours to construct. Think of your portfolio as an archive of artifacts that document your learning. Select those that you think are particularly meaningful. Use them—things like drafts, instructor or peer comments, organizational notes, before and after versions of sentences and paragraphs, final versions of your compositions, for example—to document the work you have done, demonstrate your role in your learning, and articulate your strategies and processes as they pertain to college-level rhetoric, composition, and communication.

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Be creative when making choices about organizing the sections and pages in your portfolio. For example, are the essay going to serve as major organizational elements by following the reflective introduction in sequential order? Or, are you going to organize the elements of your portfolio in a different manner, along thematic lines, (“Revision Strategies,” “Productive Mistakes”), or in terms of notable developments in your writing (“My Breakthroughs”)? University of California The Spy Who Came in From the Cold E Portfolio

1. Reflective Introduction (300+ words)

This document’s fundamental purpose is to illustrate the role you have played in your learning over the course of the quarter in 39B. You take responsibility for the quality of your work in this document (and in your ePortfolio) by assessing your performance. The reflective introduction is an analytically incisive, multi-modal composition that delivers balanced arguments about your learning and supports them with carefully selected pieces of evidence.

Tips for Writing the Reflective Introduction

  • The reflective introduction should be an analytically rigorous multimodal composition that documents the rich textures of your learning this quarter and perhaps throughout the WR39 sequence of courses and possibly Academic English courses.
  • Think of the rest of your ePortfolio as an archive of evidence that you will use in support of the arguments put forward in the introduction.
  • Refer to the various pieces of evidence from the archival portion of the portfolio in the introduction. Guide the reader to them and clearly explain your artifacts.

The reflective introduction should address and analyze your learning in the following four areas:

a. Transferring What You Know

Guiding Prompts: You do not need to answer all of the following questions, select those you find useful.

-Now that you are at the end of 39B (and looking toward 39C), take a look back to where you were at the beginning of the quarter, or even at the beginning of your college-writing experience, and analyze how your practices and habits of writing and organizing have changed and evolved.

-What have you learned about rhetoric and the notion of situated communication over the course of the two main assignments in 39B?

-You might start with your RIP project as the focal point for your ePortfolio introduction. Looking specifically at your final RIP essay, analyze and explain the choices you made as you wrote this essay, choices that enabled you to situate your essay within a specific rhetorical situation. Were you successful? What would you improve upon? What did you learn through the process of generating the RIP project? University of California The Spy Who Came in From the Cold E Portfolio

b. Your Composing Process

Guiding Prompts: You do not need to answer all of the following questions, select those you find useful.

-Your Writing Process: Describe the central strategies of your writing process. When and how did you learn them? How have they changed over time and what experiences have been most influential to you? What has 39B added to your skill-set? Explain and use examples.

-Have you experienced moments as you wrote your papers when the light bulb suddenly illuminated? Can you explain why and how this happened?

-Explain how your process of writing drafts and various other low-stakes assignments evolved over the course of the quarter. Did you become more effective at drafting and crafting?

c. Rhetoric, Genre, & Argumentation

Guiding Prompts: You do not need to answer all of the following questions, select those you find useful. Explain by using examples.

-What have you learned about rhetoric, situated communication, persuasion, and argumentation through the process of generating two essays?

-What have you learned about genres? What have you done with genres this quarter? What did they enable you to understand about rhetoric? About the concept of a rhetorical situation?

-Explain what you have learned about rhetoric and situated communication? Using your RA and RIP essays explain what you’ve learned about genre analysis and rhetorical situations.

-Was there a specific moment when your thesis became clear to you, when the light bulb illuminated, and can you explain what you did to arrive at such a moment of clear insight?

-Explain and demonstrate why and how you used various arguments and counter-arguments and numerous and different sources to strengthen your claims.

d. Revision

Guiding Prompts: You do not need to answer all of the following questions, select those you find useful.

-Explain your process of revision. How big of a role does revision play in your process of generating and discovering arguments?

-Explain how you benefited from feedback from your teacher and from your peers both in workshops and in office hours. How do you respond to criticism? What sort of critic are you becoming? Use examples of feedback you received on your work-in-progress, your final versions, and in workshops, as well as advice you gave to your peers to address these questions. University of California The Spy Who Came in From the Cold E Portfolio

-Analyze how you benefit from writing multiple drafts in terms of argumentative presentation, evidentiary support, and narrative development.

-Explain and analyze the types of revisions that benefit you. Do you make broad, conceptual revisions? Do you make structural revisions and reorganize paragraphs? Do you rewrite sentences? Do you make fine word choices? Do you alter your body of evidence through research or omission?

B. Supporting Materials

Your portfolio should be populated by numerous artifacts. All of the “process” work you do will generate artifacts; put them into your portfolio as you go along, knowing that you will continue to organize and reorganize it over the course of the quarter. But select the most meaningful artifacts carefully and write detailed captions for them so that whoever views your ePort understands your reasons for choosing a specific piece of evidence.

Possible Artifacts:

-Examples of your best writing

-“Before-and-After” examples of writing you revised

-Drafts, reading response journal assignments, and other low-stakes writing assignments

-Instructor & Peer feedback

-Cellphone pictures of your notetaking strategies, diagrams of your arguments, or other things that represent you and your learning.

-Your source materials: video, pdf files, websites, cartoons, etcetera and so forth. University of California The Spy Who Came in From the Cold E Portfolio